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Science Matters with Dr. David Suzuki
David Suzuki
“Being green should not be a bragging point, it should be the way we all act in our everyday lives and pasquier.qc.ca work and play places. If the world was shrunk to the size of a basketball, the biosphere - the zone of air, water and land where all life exists - would be thinner than a layer of varnish. That's it. It's finite and fixed and cannot grow. Humanity has exploded in number, technological musclepower, consumptive appetite and a global economy and we are now altering the accutane generic isotretinoin chemical, physical and improved generic cialis cheap biological features of the planet on a geological scale. The challenge is finding ways to live in a truly sustainable way in our home, the biosphere.” - Dr. David Suzuki

This is where Canada's foremost environmentalist Dr. David Suzuki shares his thoughts and insights into the state of our environment and our cultural priorities. Below you can see David Suzuki's weekly articles...


Wind power opponents may be blowing hot air!

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Written by Dr David Suzuki

 
 Wind power opponents may be blowing hot air - Opposition to windmills often centres on health effects, but what is it about wind power that causes people to feel ill? According to recent research, it may not be the infrasound from wind-energy installations but, oddly enough, the warnings from opponents.
 
For a study published in the American Psychological Association’s Health Psychology journal, researchers from New Zealand’s University of Auckland showed
 

Desertification is too important for Canada to ignore

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Written by Dr David Suzuki

 
Desertification is too important for Canada to ignore - The federal government recently pulled out of an important global treaty: the UN Convention to Combat Desertification. It’s aimed at fighting drought, a problem that affects almost 30 per cent of Earth’s land surface and threatens the well-being of more than a billion people worldwide, including in our Prairie provinces.

Every year, the cumulative effects of overgrazing, over-cultivation, deforestation, poor irrigation and increasing extreme weather events – including those that cause drought – permanently degrade close to 10 million hectares of land. This has led to a creeping loss of places where food can easily be grown.

 The deterioration of dry-land ecosystems has already created desert-like “dead zones” that can no longer support human life in places such as sub-Saharan Africa. No region is immune. Close to three-quarters of North America’s dry lands, including parts of the Prairies, are vulnerable to drought. And sudden loss of agricultural productivity can be devastating to farm communities across Canada.
 

Muzzling scientists is an assault on democracy

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Written by Dr David Suzuki

 
Muzzling scientists is an assault on democracy - Access to information is a basic foundation of democracy. Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms also gives us “freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and only today cheap cialis online other media of communication.”

We must protect these rights. As we alter the chemical, physical and biological properties of the biosphere, we face an increasingly uncertain future, and the best information we have to guide us comes from science. That scientists – and even librarians – are speaking out against what appear to be increasing efforts to suppress information shows we have cause for concern. The situation has become so alarming that Canada’s Information Commissioner is investigating seven government departments in response to a complaint that they’re “muzzling” scientists.
   

Lakes research shutdown doesn’t make sense

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Written by Dr David Suzuki

 
The Harpers Conservatives dicision to shut down Canada's lakes research doesn’t make any sense.  -  We can’t live without clean water. Canada is blessed with an abundance of lakes and rivers and has a global responsibility to manage them well. But if we really want to protect freshwater supplies and the ecosystems they support, we must understand how human activity and natural disturbances affect them.

The world-renowned Experimental Lakes Area in Southern Ontario has served as an outdoor laboratory for this purpose since 1968. By manipulating and studying conditions in 58 small lakes and their watersheds, scientists there have made many discoveries about the effects of human and natural activity on freshwater ecosystems and http://www.eucmac.eu/how-to-order-viagra-over-internet fish. Over the past 45 years they’ve taught us about the impacts of acid rain, mercury pollution, nanoparticles, nitrogen overload, climate change, fish farming, and many other issues.

That’s about to end. The federal government announced it will close the unique facility in 2013. It’s an odd decision, especially considering that it costs just $2-million a year to operate – one-tenth the cost of Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s security detail and about the same amount the government spent during the 2010 G20 Summit in Toronto to build a tourism pavilion with a fake lake. To make matters worse, it will cost taxpayers $50 million to shut the ELA down!
 

The fundamental failure in environmentalism

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Written by Dr David Suzuki

 
Environmentalism has failed. Over the past 50 years, environmentalists have succeeded in raising awareness, changing logging practices, stopping mega-dams and offshore drilling, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. But we were so focused on battling opponents and seeking public support that we failed to realize these battles reflect fundamentally different ways of seeing our place in the world. And it is our deep underlying worldview that determines the way we treat our surroundings.

We have not, as a species, come to grips with the explosive events that have changed our relationship with the planet.
   

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